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No Trash-Talking

Zero-Waste Movement is Here, Stronger Than Ever

The Zero-Waste Movement isn’t just for hippies and tree-huggers anymore. What started as an idea that dates back to President George H.W. Bush, is now coming to a city next to you. Under President George, Congress passed the Pollution Prevention Act which angled to reduce pollution whenever possible and spend less on controlling pollution.

 

The zero-waste movement is the popular lifestyle that aims to produce as little trash as possible. Sounds easy, but it actually isn’t. Truly reducing waste products in an industrialized industry is more complicated than what it sounds.

 

Sure, producing absolutely no waste sounds like an impossible mission, but it actually differs from person to person. It should focus on the importance of reducing waste production to a bare minimum. And you would be surprised how fast waste stacks up!

 

Bea Johnson, a French mother living in California, was undoubtly the first woman to publicize the zero-waste movement lifestyle. With her book Zero Waste Home, she seeks to help those who are looking into living a more environmentally sustainable lifestyle.

 

Today, the Zero-Waste Movement is everywhere. We see it on social media, and we all know how powerful the internet is (just look up the hashtag #zerowaste on Instagram and let us know your thoughts in the comments below!) There are youtubers, bloggers and influencers whose aim is to educate us on how important the zero waste movement is. Additionally, they show us how to make our own products such as toothpaste and/or lotion and who doesn’t like a good DIY project?

 

Like a good movement, zero waste cannot succeed without us, the people. Big companies like Ikea and Nestle have already jumped the bandwagon and announced they plan on going zero waste to help out our environment.

 

How Do I Start?

  1. Bring your own shopping tote to the supermarket
  2. When ordering a drink, ask it without a straw. Bring your own sustainable straw instead
  3. Trade plastic toothbrushes for sustainable compostable ones.
  4. Order sets of reusable utensils that you can take with you everywhere
  5. Stop buying bottled water bottles and use steel ones. 

 

Let’s Talk Trash

The average American generates 4 pounds of waste a day. There are 319,000,000 people in the US. That’s 1,276,000,000 pounds of discarded material a day. Shocked? We are too.

 

However, it makes sense. Our society revolves around disposable products.

 

Imagine your typical day, where you order a morning coffee from Starbucks, that comes with loads of ice and green straw. Then, you empty your last snack bag, blow your nose with Kleenex, wash and dry your hands with paper towels, unpack that box that came in the mail for you, filled with cartons and bubble wrap… the list is endless, and it only adds up.

 

We’ve heard it all. From “This will not make a difference” to “This is so cool! But I already recycle” and “I want in, it’s awesome!”

 

While recycling is great, it only plays a small role in trying to find a solution for this problem. As we mentioned earlier, we discard billions of pounds of stuff a day and even if all of it were to be recyclable, it would take a lot of energy, gas, water, transportation, etc. Recycling is not the ultimate answer, therefore:

 

Reject what you don’t need

Reduce what you use/have

Reuse what you can/use

Recycle what you can’t

 

If we can get in the habit of the first three, we can drastically cut down how much we are contributing to the problem.

 

Tell us, are you reducing, recycling or rejecting?

The Zero-Waste Movement isn’t just for hippies and tree-huggers anymore. What started as an idea that dates back to President George H.W. Bush, is now coming to a city next to you. Under President George, Congress passed the Pollution Prevention Act which angled to reduce pollution whenever possible and spend less on controlling pollution.

The zero-waste movement is the popular lifestyle that aims to produce as little trash as possible. Sounds easy, but it actually isn’t. Truly reducing waste products in an industrialized industry is more complicated than what it sounds.

Sure, producing absolutely no waste sounds like an impossible mission, but it actually differs from person to person. It should focus on the importance of reducing waste production to a bare minimum. And you would be surprised how fast waste stacks up!

Bea Johnson, a French mother living in California, was undoubtly the first woman to publicize the zero-waste movement lifestyle. With her book Zero Waste Home, she seeks to help those who are looking into living a more environmentally sustainable lifestyle.

Today, the Zero-Waste Movement is everywhere. We see it on social media, and we all know how powerful the internet is (just look up the hashtag #zerowaste on Instagram and let us know your thoughts in the comments below!) There are youtubers, bloggers and influencers whose aim is to educate us on how important the zero waste movement is. Additionally, they show us how to make our own products such as toothpaste and/or lotion and who doesn’t like a good DIY project?

Like a good movement, zero waste cannot succeed without us, the people. Big companies like Ikea and Nestle have already jumped the bandwagon and announced they plan on going zero waste to help out our environment.

How Do I Start?

  1. Bring your own shopping tote to the supermarket
  2. When ordering a drink, ask it without a straw. Bring your own sustainable straw instead
  3. Trade plastic toothbrushes for sustainable compostable ones.
  4. Order sets of reusable utensils that you can take with you everywhere
  5. Stop buying bottled water bottles and use steel ones. 

Let’s Talk Trash

The average American generates 4 pounds of waste a day. There are 319,000,000 people in the US. That’s 1,276,000,000 pounds of discarded material a day. Shocked? We are too.

However, it makes sense. Our society revolves around disposable products.

Imagine your typical day, where you order a morning coffee from Starbucks, that comes with loads of ice and green straw. Then, you empty your last snack bag, blow your nose with Kleenex, wash and dry your hands with paper towels, unpack that box that came in the mail for you, filled with cartons and bubble wrap… the list is endless, and it only adds up.

We’ve heard it all. From “This will not make a difference” to “This is so cool! But I already recycle” and “I want in, it’s awesome!”

While recycling is great, it only plays a small role in trying to find a solution for this problem. As we mentioned earlier, we discard billions of pounds of stuff a day and even if all of it were to be recyclable, it would take a lot of energy, gas, water, transportation, etc. Recycling is not the ultimate answer, therefore:

Reject what you don’t need

Reduce what you use/have

Reuse what you can/use

Recycle what you can’t

If we can get in the habit of the first three, we can drastically cut down how much we are contributing to the problem.

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